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Insight into the Graduate Job Market in a Professional Working Survey by 1PGR

Insight into the Graduate Job Market in a Professional Working Survey by 1PGR

207 18–29 year olds (103 male 104 Female) took part in a survey to find out more about their recent experience of the graduate job market. Our findings were very interesting and 1PGR has compiled a short report on the trends and insights that were uncovered. 


Why they chose to accept their first job 

  • 32% of graduates surveyed said they took their first job because they believed it would lead to something better.
  • 25% took it purely because it was a job.
  • Convenient location was the least important factor with only 3% of those surveyed stating it was an influencing factor.
  • 53% of graduates got the type of work they wanted as their first professional job.
  • 55% of graduates are still doing something related to their first professional role.

The most difficult aspects of the working world to overcome

  • 27% of grads found that not knowing what they wanted to do the most difficult aspect.
  • 17% found that insufficient training made it very difficult to fit in.
  • 12% said that they were shocked that the companies they joined were not as legitimate as they first appeared.

Other points about the difficulty of new working life that were raised were that they were not able to get a work life balance, the graduates did not have the experience the companies expected, the transition from university to work life was very hard, the long hours and repetitive nature of the role, understanding the industry jargon and fitting in with a new team.

When asked what they would change about their job search if they could do it again:

  • 36% of the graduates surveyed said they would take more time to find the right role for them.
  • 15% said they would try to focus on getting a role more related to their degree.
  • 13% said they would ask for more money.

But the best answer has to be: 

Interestingly though it’s not all doom and gloom, 20% said that they wouldn’t change a thing! 

In a comparison of genders 62% of women surveyed were working full time compared to 51% of men. Only 17% of women were unemployed compared to a whopping 30% of men. 

In most other aspects they were relatively similar.